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Pocket Book

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Pocket Book

 

PocketBook started out of my aversion for receipts. They are always taking up space in my purse yet when it comes to returning an item I can never find the right receipt. In edition to that, the process of shredding old receipts can be tedious and time-consuming. Furthermore they have a very negative effect on the environment, millions of trees are cut down to make receipts yet many cannot be recycled because of the oils added to the paper.

No one seems to want paper receipts, and few people really need them, yet they are ubiquitous — and even worse, unsustainable. Over 250 million gallons of oil, 10 million trees and 1 billion gallons of water are consumed each year in the creation of receipts for the United States alone, generating 1.5 billion pounds of waste.
— Will Hines for the Huffington Post

My aversion sparked the idea for an app that could completely replace your wallet and transform the checkout process. While I realized that many apps like this already exist, I had not found one that focused on the idea of a digital receipt and also combined multiple touch-points of the checkout procedure into one app.

THE SOLUTION: 

An app that redefines the checkout experience. The whole process is expedited, no fumbling for a wallet or trying to find a particular receipt, card, or coupon. The app holds all of this information, guiding the user through the checkout and return process.


USER PERSONAS

shopping-kids.jpg

CHRISTINA Sanchez

AGE: 39 
OCCUPATION: Stay at home mom

CHALLENGES: 

  • Typically has 3 young children with her while she is shopping
  • Can never find her receipts when she needs them, often loses them in the process of the check-out–never making it into her purse
  • Always forgets her coupons while trying to get all the kids out the door 

NEEDS: 

  • A quick and simple checkout
  • Be able to quickly locate her receipts
  • Keep track of and manage her family's spending and savings
  • A way to easily find coupons

DavID ERICKSON

AGE: 30 
OCCUPATION: Business Man

CHALLENGES: 

  • Has trouble keeping track of his personal and business spending 
  • Sometimes gets his business and personal cards mixed up in his wallet
  • Often forgets or loses receipts he needs to expense for work

NEEDS: 

  • A way to easily save all of his business receipts
  • Be able to easily export his expensed receipts

Dana RENSINI

AGE: 20 
OCCUPATION: College Student

CHALLENGES: 

  • Budgeting her money between school, food, rent, and social activities 
  • Always forgets to look for coupons before going to the store
  • Often loses her rewards and gift cards, missing out on deals

NEEDS: 

  • A place to store all her gift and reward cards
  • Easily access coupons for a variety of stores, all in one place
  • Be able to know how much she is saving and spending on each shopping trip
  • On a tight budget; often returning items that she does not need, just to get back a couple of bucks—needs all her receipts in one place

CHECK-OUT USER FLOW

The above checkout flow is based on the average checkout, combining observed experiences seen at multiple businesses and retailers. I found that many people get flustered during Part 3 of a checkout. During this stage the user is trying to juggle getting out their rewards card, payment method, or coupons, while also answering questions from the pin pad or cashier (paper or plastic? cash back? would you like to donate a dollar?). I noticed, especially if there was a line at the register, that the last stage was very rushed, as the cashier is handing the customer their receipt, trying to move onto the the next customer,  the current customer is also attempting to stuff their belongings back into a wallet or purse and grab all their bagged items. This can overwhelm the customer making them feel hurried and unwelcome. 

The above checkout flow is based on the average checkout, combining observed experiences seen at multiple businesses and retailers. I found that many people get flustered during Part 3 of a checkout. During this stage the user is trying to juggle getting out their rewards card, payment method, or coupons, while also answering questions from the pin pad or cashier (paper or plastic? cash back? would you like to donate a dollar?). I noticed, especially if there was a line at the register, that the last stage was very rushed, as the cashier is handing the customer their receipt, trying to move onto the the next customer,  the current customer is also attempting to stuff their belongings back into a wallet or purse and grab all their bagged items. This can overwhelm the customer making them feel hurried and unwelcome. 


RECIEPT BREAKDOW

Receipts contain a lot of information, some of it for the customer, some for the retailer. The beauty of a digital receipt is that some of this extraneous information can be concealed, and accessed only when needed. The image below highlights which information is most pertinent to the customer, and should be included in the new receipt design.

 
Scan 1.jpeg
 

SKETCHES

NEW CHECKOUT PROCESS


USER-TESTING

Feedback & Suggestions:

  • The ability to select items from or the whole receipt to add to an expenses list that would be found in the history section
  • A savings recap from the purchase along with the number of coupons applied during the purchase will be tallied on the company's "thank you" page to the customer

Other points brought to light:

  • Most testers said they usually cannot remember the exact date that they purchased an item, unless it was for a special occasion—this brought into question whether the date option was necessary in the history section
  • Is it necessary to have the app ask if coupons and a reward card should be used every time you make a purchase? Is it possible for the app to know what store you are at and just automatically apply the rewards card and coupon?
  • How would this work for a small business? Is there a way that receipts can be sent to a person's personal account via email or specific user number?
  • Can a person just use a rewards card during purchase or just use the coupons section?
I think I prefer being able to see all of my cards during the checkout process, as opposed to swiping through them.
I’m lucky if I can remember which month I bought something in, let alone the day.

DESIGN


FEATURES

 

Users can swipe through all of the credit, debit and gift they have added to PocketBook. 

In the account information section, users can edit information or delete a card.

NEW CHECKOUT PROCESS:

  1. Select the business you are shopping at from a list of options.
     
  2. Choose your method of payment: credit, debit, cash, or check. If a credit or debit card is chosen, the user must verify the card's use with a fingerprint, then sign or type in their pin.
     
  3. Once the payment method is selected the user will get a unique barcode. When scanned the barcode transmits the payment along with any coupons and rewards for the chosen store. 
     
  4. After scanning, a receipt detailing the purchase appears on the screen. The receipt is archived and can be reviewed in the history section of PocketBook. 
     
  5. After the receipt is saved a summary page appears, detailing the savings, coupons used, and rewards earned from the transaction.

Additionally users can use the app independently in the checkout process, only using it for the rewards card section, or coupons, and not the payment section. 

 

 
 
 
 
 

In the history section of PocketBook, users can swipe through all of the stores they have shopped at. This allows them to easily locate a receipt for return, reference or add to their expense list.

 
 

On the receipt users can scroll through all of the items they purchased during the transaction. 

 

Users can expense an item from a receipt by swiping left, revealing the expense button. This marks the item with a small green dot indicating it has been added to the user's expense list in their account. 

Additionally an entire receipt can be expensed in the history section. This is indicated by a small green dot, encircled with a green border.